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Category Archives: Quotes

Spurgeon on Meditation and Scripture

“There are times when solitude is better than society, and silence is wiser than speech. We should be better Christians if we were more alone, waiting upon God, and gathering through meditation on his Word spiritual strength for labour in his service. We ought to muse upon the things of God, because we thus get the real nutriment out of them…Our bodies are not supported by merely taking food into the mouth, but the process which really supplies the muscle, and the nerve, and the sinew, and the bone, is the process of digestion. It is by digestion that the outward food becomes assimilated with the inner life. Our souls are not nourished merely by listening awhile to this, and then to that, and then to the other part of divine truth. Hearing, reading, marking, and learning, all require inwardly digesting to complete their usefulness, and the inward digesting of the truth lies for the most part in meditating upon it. Why is it that some Christians, although they hear many sermons, make but slow advances in the divine life? Because they neglect their closets, and do not thoughtfully meditate on God’s Word. They love the wheat, but they do not grind it; they would have the corn, but they will not go forth into the fields to gather it; the fruit hangs upon the tree, but they will not pluck it; the water flows at their feet, but they will not stoop to drink it.”

Charles H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening: Daily Readings, Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006).

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2015 in Quotes

 

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Spurgeon on Prayer

“The act of prayer teaches us our unworthiness, which is a very salutary lesson for such proud beings as we are. If God gave us favors without constraining us to pray for them we should never know how poor we are, but a true prayer is an inventory of wants, a catalog of necessities, a revelation of hidden poverty. While it is an application to divine wealth, it is a confession of human emptiness. The most healthy state of a Christian is to be always empty in self and constantly depending upon the Lord for supplies; to be always poor in self and rich in Jesus; weak as water personally, but mighty through God to do great exploits; and hence the use of prayer, because, while it adores God, it lays the creature where it should be, in the very dust…Prayer girds human weakness with divine strength, turns human folly into heavenly wisdom, and gives to troubled mortals the peace of God.”

Charles H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening: Daily Readings, Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006).

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2015 in Quotes

 

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The Danger of a Self-Focus: Paul Tripp

The most dangerous kinds of self-focus are those that take on the form of the good things of the kingdom of God…The Good News is packaged and marketed (using, uncritically, all the techniques of modern advertising) as a religious product: offering “peace of mind”, “how to get to heaven”, “health and prosperity”, “inner healing”, “the answer to all your problems” etc. What is promoted as “faith in God” often turns out to be a means for obtaining emotional security or material blessing in this life and an insurance policy in the next…It does not raise fundamental and disturbing questions about the assumptions upon which people build their lives…It is simply a religious image of the secular consumerist culture in which modern men and women live.”

Tripp, Paul David (2007-10-31). A Quest for More: Living for Something Bigger than You (p. 74). New Growth Press. Kindle Edition.

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2014 in Quotes

 

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Living for Self: Paul Tripp

No one ever says, “I have decided to forsake the glories of the kingdom of God to pursue the self-oriented glories of my own kingdom.” Instead, because of the blindness of sin and the fact that we exist in little moments , so much of our kingdom building takes place without conscious intentionality. And because we have defined biblical morality as the keeping of a set of rules , rather than the ownership of our hearts by the Lord, much of the conflict of kingdoms goes unnoticed. As a result, our lives end up being shaped by a confusing mix of big kingdom rules (the kingdom of God) and little kingdom rules (the kingdom of self).

Tripp, Paul David (2007-10-31). A Quest for More: Living for Something Bigger than You (p. 64). New Growth Press. Kindle Edition.

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2014 in Quotes

 

Bridges on Proverbs 3:5-6

This is the polestar (directing principle) for a child of God—faith in his Father’s providence, promises, and grace. This trust is not the mere cold assent of enlightened judgment. It is trust … with all your heart. It is a childlike, unwavering confidence in our Father’s well-proved wisdom, faithfulness, and love. He is truth itself. Therefore, he wants us to take him at his word and to prove his word to the very limit of his power.
But our trust must not only be complete—it must be exclusive. No other confidence, no confidence in the flesh, can exist alongside it (Philippians 3:3). Man with all his pride feels that he wants something to lean on. As a fallen being, he naturally leans on his own understanding and on himself. Human power is his idol. His understanding is his God. Many people would prefer to have a lack of principle rather than a lack of talent.
Charles Bridges, Proverbs, Crossway Classic Commentaries (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2001), 26.

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2014 in Quotes

 

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Good Reminder on Preaching from MacArthur

Thankful for this very good reminder, from an excellent book:

Rightly dividing the Word of truth, then, is the central mark of a truly successful preacher. In the end, when he stands before the Chief Shepherd, only one factor about his ministry will ultimately matter: Was he faithful? He may have been a dynamic orator, a master storyteller, and a winsome communicator. His church might have been large and his ministry well known. But if his own faithfulness is absent, all of those externals are merely wood, hay, and straw (cf. 1 Cor. 3:10–15).

Wallace Benn et al., Preach the Word: Essays on Expository Preaching (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2007).

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2014 in Quotes

 

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Excerpt on Bible Interpretation and Preaching

We all read the Bible through our own presuppositions. Inevitably, we cannot approach any text without inputting our own cultural conditioning into our reading of it. We have a particular background. We live at a particular time in history. Our past experience, values, and priorities have all combined to build up a personal, individual framework of thought and behavior, convictions and attitudes, that makes each of us the unique people we are. But this framework can be the enemy of careful observation.
The danger is that certain words or ideas in the text will trigger ideas in the preacher’s memory bank that are then downloaded and uncritically included in a sermon. So we end up preaching our frame work rather than the biblical text, unless the Bible text is questioning our framework every time we are preparing. It is not that framework preaching is wrong if the framework is itself biblically orthodox. What is said will probably be true, but the preaching will soon become re-ductionist and predictable. The problem is that such preaching does not challenge the church, and it will not change the world. It becomes impository of the preacher’s word upon the text, which has to dance to the preacher’s tune—the agenda that he has constructed—rather than being expository of the fundamental meaning of the Bible, with all its necessary challenges and unsettling disturbance to our inherently sinful, this-worldly patterns of thought and behavior. In John Stott’s words, it is the function of biblical preaching both “to disturb the comfortable and then to comfort the disturbed.” And that process begins with the preacher in his preparation.

Wallace Benn, Preach the Word: Essays on Expository Preaching (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2007).

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2014 in Quotes

 

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